Daily Micro: Yesterday’s Visionaries in Today’s World ~ Captain Mission

Acknowledging Captain Mission

Many have suspected me.

William S. Burroughs II (Naked Lunch), buddies with Kerouac and Ginsberg, scion of the Burroughs family whose William Seward Burroughs I, founded the Burroughs Corporation, a writer with one foot in the beat culture and the other in the trappings of the mainstream, got close to me when he wrote;

“There is simply no room left for ‘freedom from the tyranny of government’ since city dwellers depend on it for food, power, water, transportation, protection, and welfare. Your right to live where you want, with companions of your choosing, under laws to which you agree, died in the eighteenth century with Captain Mission.

Only a miracle or a disaster could restore it.”

So, who am I who possessed the right to live where I wanted, with companions of my choosing, under laws to which me and me mates agreed before I died in the eighteenth century?

Captain Mission, you say. A writer’s prerogative, you say. Metaphor, you say.

Listen hear, ye laddies.

In the 2nd volume of A General History of the Pyrates (published 1728), Captain Charles Johnson (Cholly we called him) yielded my tale.

Onto Madagascar we flew upon the waves and made ourselves a little place in the sun and sand we called “Libertalia” where all men and all women would live in liberty, equality and fraternity.

Some said I was a figment of Johnson’s imagination. Some said Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe) was Charles Johnson. Some said I was a rogue and pyrate, the King of the Pyrates.

What say ye? Do not liberty, equality and fraternity burn in ye hearts and souls?

Be ye pyrates or be ye city dwellers or dwellers of your minds dependent upon the wiles of government for food, power, water, transportation, protection, and welfare?

As William S. Burroughs II wrote, is “there simply no room left for ‘freedom from the tyranny of government’, from the tyranny of minds being so conquered that ye spirits drift away and ye consider me and your freedom as metaphors?

~ Stephen J. Bergstrom

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